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10 Things To Do In The Car Without Media

When we went to buy our trusty van, the salesman assured us that we could upgrade to TV/DVD player for “just a few hundred bucks.” I’m sure he didn’t like my answer, because I told him the last thing I needed was another screen in my life. Needless to say, we didn’t get the upgrade.

 

Not only that, we don’t have iPads, and the one cell phone we own is game free. So how do we go on some many adventures with our little ones without going stir-crazy in the car? Well, as school teachers, we have a bunch of fun games, many of them learning or thinking games that will keep you sane on long car rides without resorting to shoving a screen in front of your child’s face. Here’s a list of our favorites:

Tip #1: Progressive Storytelling.

One of our boys’ favorite car games is to tell a progressive story. This means that someone starts and tells the beginning of a story. We find that 2-3 sentences is about the right length, and it’s usually best if Mom or Dad starts. Then we take turns adding two or three sentences each until the story is complete. This game is really fun, but it takes some practice. Even our 4-year-old gets involved, though. Note: Don’t let the stories get personal, or you’ll have brothers battling each other with swords before you know it!

 

Tip #2: Adventure Bingo.

Our favorite game to play in the car is Adventure Bingo. This requires a little preparation, but it will keep your kids interested. When we’re planning our trip, we do a little research on what we might see. Then we create a 5×5 bingo sheet with different things the boys can look for. This is really easy for a place like Yellowstone, and we’ve put bingo sheets together for several places that you can access including: Yellowstone, Zion, Bryce Canyon, and New Mexico. Remember, we love to look for animals, but we also use petroglyphs, waterfalls, cabins, and even signs.

Tip #3: Teakettle Game.

My Mom taught me this one when I was little, and it is best for kids over 8, but our 7 and 4 year-olds get plenty of involvement. This game is played by taking turns coming up with homophone (or homonym) pairs. The first player comes up with a pair and uses them in two sentences. However, instead of saying the homophone, replace it with “Teakettle.” So I might say: “I got my ‘teakettle’ cut,” and “A ‘teakettle’ hopped across the road.” Then you’d have to guess that my word is hair/hare.

 

Tip #4: Alphabet Game.

This one is an oldie, but a goodie. Even preschoolers can look for the letters of the alphabet in order on signs. This seemed difficult when we adults were growing up, but there are so many signs these days, you can usually go through the alphabet on a 20 minute drive. After we finish that, we often extend the game by searching for all the numbers from 1-20. It is more challenging than you think to find a 17!

Number 15 is quite easy to find here in Utah!

Tip #5: Alphabet Categories.

In this game choose a category and then go through the alphabet trying to think of one thing for each letter of the alphabet for that category. So if the category is animals, A = Ape, B = Bat, etc. Some great categories are animals, birds, plants, cities, countries, boy names, girl names, and foods. We love this game because we get to work together. We also found a game called “Name 5” which follows this same basic premise. We put the cards in a baggie and this game lives in the car full-time now.

Tip #6: Name that Tune.

This is a simple one, and it will take a while to get good at it. We play a song and see who can name it. We usually start letting the littlest guess, and then move up if to give everyone a fair shot. You can do this with songs or artists, or even play something from the Disney list and let your kids name which movie it’s from or which character sang it.

Tip #7: License Plates.

We love the license plate game, and we used to get a map and have our kids color in the states of the license plates they found (it’s amazing how fast they learned the map). Then they’d write Canadian Provinces down, too. On a trip to Yellowstone we can always find over 40 of the states. This works great, but last year we found a really cool Melissa & Doug toy that the boys love. This is a map of the United States that has a license plate that you can flip when you see it. That way we don’t have to print a new map every time, or even deal with children coloring the wrong state. Now, even our 4 year-old knows where Georgia is.

Tip #8: Genealogy Game.

The genealogy game came out of desperation on a long trip. We were coming back from southern Utah and had another hour to go. We needed something to pass the time, so we ask the kids to name Mom and Dad’s siblings and their spouses. Then we went to cousins. Next we did Grandparents. Since we come from large families, this took a lot of time. As the kids got better and better, we started quizzing them on their grandparents and great-grandparents. Soon, they wanted to study a fan chart before vacations so they could do well at this game. We were thrilled!

We have a large family, so the genealogy game takes us awhile!

Tip #9: Song Words.

The game Song Words is best for older children or adults. The game is simple. Choose a word like “Moon” or “Rainbow” or “Rock” and then take turns naming a song with that word in it. So if the word is Sun, you might name Sunshine of My Love, Here Comes the Sun, or even Lights by Journey (“… and the sun shines on the bay…”). It’s surprising how many songs you can come up with for many common words. Tip: Save “Love” for that cross country trip!

 

Tip #10: Books on CD.

Sometimes our boys like to listen to books on CD. You can download some stories from the Internet or check them out from the library before a trip. We like to do this because we can discuss the stories as we go. A few years ago we tried this with a Greek Myth CD and our boys loved it. Now they always want to hear the old Greek stories. It’s been so fun to teach them about Hercules and Odysseus.

Bonus Tip: DJ Sing-Along.

Our favorite standby game is when Mom plays DJ Sing-Along while Dad drives. She goes through each member of our family in order and asks them which song they’d like to sing. There are no vetoes, so Mom plays each person’s choice. You can sing along or not, it’s up to you.

6 Comments

  • I love this post! Especially the part about not using a TV in the car. I feel exactly the same way. We have a DVD player in our van, but have never told the kids about it, and when they ask, “What’s that?” we change the subject! Ha! Thanks for the great tips!!

  • Thank you for this wonderful list. Planning a road trip in the south west of the us we need lots of ideas for the driving parts. The bingo sheets are amazing – I think I have to do some research homework 😉. Some of your games are played as well here in Germany. And I have another one for you. We call it “Ich packe meinen Koffer…” Maybe I can translate it “I pack my suitcase…”. The first player starts with “I pack my suitcase and I put in it a …doll.” Next player has to repeat and to put another thing with him. “I pack my suitcase and I put in it a doll and a bottle of water.” Next “I pack…a doll, a bottle of water and a shirt” And so on and on. It is a lot of fun and often the kids are better than we adults 👍👍👍. And we pack a lot of crazy things in our suitcases !!! You can finish at a number (20 items?) or if anyone cannot remember the packing list.
    Have fun and greetings from Germany, Christiane

    • Thank you for this great game! We always feel gratitude when one of our readers is willing to help us expand our experiences! We will be adding Pack My Suitcase to our next road trip. Thanks for sharing!

      ~UAF

  • I love love love this list! I also told the car salesman that I did NOT want the DVD package on our Explorer. I can’t wait to try some of these ideas out! Wonderful list!